How do you say goodnight in Pashto?

How do you say goodnight in Pashto?

Good Night in Pashto is (shpa mo pa kheyr) شپه مو په خير.

How do you say hello in?

Pay attention to what the people around you are saying….How to Say Hello in Different Languages.
|Language||Informal Greeting||Formal Greeting|
|English||Hey||Hello|
|French||Salut||Bonjour|
|Gaelic||Hug||Dia dhuit|
|German||Hallo||Guten tag|
What does Khair mean in Pashto?
خير good, goodness, charity, alm, blessing.

What is your name in Pashto?

|English||Pushto|
|Excuse me (Saying sorry)||baKhana ghwaarom|
|My name is …….||zama num ………… deh|
|What is your name?||staa num tsa deh?|
|Do you speak English||ta pe English(Angrezi) Khabaree|

How do you say hi in a cute way?

Here are some cute ways to say hi:
– “Hey, cutie! How’s it going?”
– “Hey there, beautiful! What have you been up to so far today?”
– “Hey, lovely! How was your day?”
What can I say instead of hi?
synonyms for hi
– greetings.
– howdy.
– welcome.
– bonjour.
– buenas noches.
– buenos dias.
– good day.
– good morning.
What does Gurl mean?
Scottish. : howl, growl, snarl.
Widely used phrases
Learn the 30 most important words in Pashto! You plan on travelling to Pakistan and Afghanistan? Here you can find the translation of the 50 most important words and expressions into Pashto. If you are about to travel to Pakistan and Afghanistan, this is exactly what you are looking for!
How to say ” welcome ” in Pashto-Quora?
Here are some. English: He is Jobless. Pashto: Sa Dala de/da plar paiso ta naast day. Pashto explanation: He is a cuckold/ living on father income. 2. English: They are rich. Pahto: Tole da podarao paisay dee. Pashto explanation: This is all narcotics money. 3. English: He is a Caring husband.

What do you say to your brother in Pashto?

You can say the Islamic greeting, or “pa khere ragh le” (you have come safely). Brother is “roar,” so you could also say “zama roara.”. Together, you would say “pa khere ragh le, zama roara.”.

What’s the correct way to say za lambam in Pashto?

The straightforward and exact answer is “Za Lambam” (Za Laam-bum), but we often don’t say it like that, especially when talking to non-friends or elderly people. You could say “Kapry badlom,” which translates to “changing clothes.”.